Although the overall number of these collisions went down compared to 2015 by approximately 800, the statistics still show there are a lot of drivers not paying attention.

At the risk of sounding really negative, there are a lot of problem drivers doing dangerous things on Canadian roads these days. New statistics coming from Edmonton today show just how problematic tailgating in particular is.

As reported by the CBC, Edmonton released the top 10 locations for collisions caused by following-too-closely last year, which we've listed at the end of this article. Overall, there were 23,149 collisions in the city in 2016, and more than 8,900 of those were due to tailgating. The result was more than 1,300 injuries to those involved in the incidents.

Although the overall number of these collisions went down compared to 2015 by approximately 800, the statistics still show there are a lot of drivers not paying attention. One of the reasons for the decrease is thanks to intersections that have sharper right-turn angles, city spokesperson Gary Dyck said to the CBC. These angles mean drivers are looking more to the left when turning, rather than behind them.

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It's probably not surprising to hear that according to a survey released in January, the main reason for tailgating collisions is because drivers aren't satisfied with the speed of vehicles ahead of them. Of course, the irony is that cutting down on tailgating crashes is a simple fix: "Watching your speed and slowing down early before intersections can prevent you from having a very bad day," said senior research coordinator Laura Thue with the City of Edmonton's Office of Traffic Safety, to the CBC.

Overly-long shoulder checks can also cause more collisions, because drivers assume the vehicle in front of them has started accelerating, when in fact some have stopped again. By the time the driver behind has realized, it's too late, and fenders have been bent.

The city of Edmonton has adopted a campaign called Vision Zero, which according to its website, is "a global initiative to save lives and eliminate major injuries from motor vehicle collisions." It's the first major Canadian city to adopt Vision Zero, which began in Sweden in 1997. The aforementioned reduction in tailgating collisions seems to be a positive step toward better road safety in Edmonton. It'll be interesting to see if these numbers decline next year and beyond, in Edmonton and other cities across Canada.

Edmonton's Top 10 following-too-closely collision locations in 2016, and the number of collisions at each spot:

107th Avenue and 142nd Street 88
Yellowhead Trail and 121st Street 65
Yellowhead Trail and 149th Street 65
Yellowhead Trail and 127th Street 58
23rd Avenue and 91st Street 46
34th Avenue and 91st Street 44
Yellowhead Trail and Fort Road 44
34th Avenue and Gateway Boulevard 43
34th Avenue and Calgary Trail 41
137th Avenue and 97th Street 40
Rabbit Hill Road and Terwillegar Drive 40

Source: CBC

 

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