We don’t recommend doing this with passengers at the campground.

Come on people, can’t we just enjoy an afternoon on the back 40 doing, you know, normal things like spinning donuts on quad bikes? There was once a time when terms like back flip were only heard in the confines of gymnastics meets, or on television every two years for the Olympics. But then the 1980s happened, and kids got bored simply riding their BMX bikes and skateboards. Now, we have bicycles routinely pulling double back flips, dirt bikes and snowmobiles doing single back flips, and freaking monster trucks doing front flips.

 

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The latest wheeled stunt comes from off-road racing pro RJ Anderson, who has a knack for manhandling Polaris RZR side-by-sides. Through UTVUnderground.com, Anderson has already displayed his skill by crashing through walls, jumping over logging trucks, grinding along metal rails skateboard style, blasting through ruined post-apocalyptic buildings, and yes, back flipping. In this latest adventure, Anderson does just about all of that while conquering the mountains of Southern California through a dizzying array of corners, jumps, and several laps around the wall of death.

Wait, what?

For the headlining stunt in this short film, engineers built a 360-degree wooden wall that Anderson enters from the bottom. Will a little help from Sir Issac Newton and his laws of motion, the RZR proceeds to make countless revolutions within said wall before dropping down through an exit at the base. Jumping to 3:39 in the video will get you to the spot where we think he got totally nauseous, because we did just from watching. Anderson then goes on to end the run with a back flip, because that’s now the proper way to cap such adventures.

Obviously, the turbocharged RZR used in the video isn’t stock. For starters it’s no longer a side-by-side – Anderson sits in the middle like a McLaren F1 pilot, while seriously beefed-up suspension and aggressive tires handle the terrain. We'll give credit where credit is due; the guy certainly has skill and plenty of guts, and the video work is top notch. Watch the video above if you haven't seen it already, and stick around to the end for some mildly interesting behind-the-scenes footage.

 

Source: UTVUndergroud.com via YouTube

 

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